The new StackOverflow "Code of Conduct" is bad for the community

Apr 8, 2018
372
1
18
#1
The internet, where everyone was rude and straight to the point, is changing.

StackOverflow just came up with this bull💩 "code of conduct", telling us what we should do.
https://stackoverflow.com/conduct

This is 3 times the amount of words to describe the issue.
I know it's meant to be woooo, polite, this is actually bad.
stackoverflow.PNG

The first time I asked for help on the internet, I was offended by the way people being toxic, but soon I got used to it, and it is the most straight to the point method of getting real information. The new "code of conduct" is asking me to talk like extremely politely on the phone.

StackOverflow is already the most useful site on the planet, it's so efficient I can search the exact answers of technical questions in usually 30s.
Why do these executives want to MICROMANAGE everything, you even micromanage the way we speak? To make synergy? f🅰️k off~
 

Morte

Crib owner
Mar 31, 2018
613
3
18
#2
It's not like there's a competing community that is more helpful and polite with the same expertise, and StackOverflow is trying to beat them.
It's already the best, I don't understand why they feel the need to do this.

Oh wait, scroll to the bottom
stackoverflow botton.PNG

They learned it from this:
https://open.buffer.com/code-of-conduct/
Titled "Our Code of Conduct And Why It’s Important For Diversity And Inclusion"

microaggression.PNG
 
Apr 8, 2018
372
1
18
#3
I really don't want a highly technical site to take political sides, don't know where this is going, actually I do, it's inevitable.

BTW "ageism"?🤣🤣🤣
 

Morte

Crib owner
Mar 31, 2018
613
3
18
#5
BTW what's StackOverflow? Why is it called Stackoverflow? I don't understand the gist of if.
C#:
public string Test { get {return Test;}}
In this case, the property is calling itself or some 💩, and it produces endless 💩 for the computer to do, those 💩 are stored in RAM, this causes a stackoverflow error.

StackOverflow basically took that niche name for a Reddit-like Quora site for programming questions.
 
Apr 1, 2018
479
3
18
#6
In this case, the property is calling itself or some 💩, and it produces endless 💩 for the computer to do, those 💩 are stored in RAM, this causes a stackoverflow error.
Oh, ok thanks, that's some pretty vivid explanation, :geek::geek::geek::geek::geek::geek::geek::geek::geek:

Why would a geek head site want to regulate the way geeks speak? Did they hire some execs from a media company or some out of touch marketing department or something?
The way they want the community talk is really "official" and "markety", anyone with a slight trace of personality don't speak like that.

Those are probably the execs that turned YouTube from a toxic edgy nihilistic site to a family friendly sponsor house.
 
S

selinuxdisabled

Guest
#7
God damn dudes chill, I worked as a software engineer before, this happens regularly.
You would think it's all about the logic and codemanship, but not exactly.
We're talking about a fairly sized company, the executives will always bend over to liberal values and micomanage the way you do things.

You just need to not give a 💩, which is the reason why I got fired, but I got compensated anyway, so I haven't learned a thing.